Logo

Equipment Mechanic I (#MCCA01)
$24,346.00 Yearly Min / $30,433.00 Yearly Mid / $36,520.00 Yearly Max


Equipment Mechanic II (#MCCA02)
$26,048.00 Yearly Min / $32,560.00 Yearly Mid / $39,072.00 Yearly Max


Equipment Mechanic III (#MCCA03)
$27,870.00 Yearly Min / $34,838.00 Yearly Mid / $41,806.00 Yearly Max


Equipment Mechanic IV (#MCCA04)
$29,825.00 Yearly Min / $37,281.00 Yearly Mid / $44,737.00 Yearly Max


Master Mechanic (#MCCA05)
$31,912.00 Yearly Min / $39,890.00 Yearly Mid / $47,868.00 Yearly Max




Description of Occupational Work

This class series uses five levels of work in the Custodial, Maintenance and Trades Group, Mechanical Trades Series, and describes skilled mechanic work to encompass inspecting, diagnosing, repairing, servicing, aligning, setting up, adjusting, testing, and or replacing parts/components on a wide variety of maintenance/construction/watercraft/all-terrain equipment. The equipment includes assemblies and components such as igniters, pumps, blades, graders, turn tables, buckets, booms, drag lines, belt loaders, and disbursement systems with multiple mechanical, hydraulic, ignition, lighting, warning, injection and related systems. Mechanic work also includes disassembling and overhauling gasoline/diesel engines and component systems, performing operational checks/road testing for diagnostic purposes, and performing corrective measures. Assignments require evaluative thinking, including determining problems, determining the life of equipment, and prescribing, scheduling and performing corrective measures. The mechanics also perform tasks associated with the craft/trade such as operating tow trucks/ wreckers/ boats to respond to emergencies, and using operator manuals, service bulletins, and personal computers to perform research/diagnosis, interpret schematics, order parts, and analyze equipment malfunctions.

Note:  The career ladder incorporates levels, I, II, III, and IV; depending upon agency needs, positions can be classified up to IV (highest level in the career ladder); however, the complexity of work assigned to positions in some agencies may support a career ladder through the III level. The I level is to provide entry for hiring new employees into the class series but does not preclude hiring new employees at higher levels. To implement the career ladder, current employees are assigned to the level for which they meet minimum qualifications and promotional standards. Employees may be promoted through the career ladder in accordance with promotional standards for those levels assigned to an agency. The promotional standards, a selection document under separate cover, set forth the criteria that defines and describes the complexity of work required for advancement to each level through the career ladder.

Essential Functions

Essential functions are fundamental, core functions common to all positions in the class series and are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all job duties for any one position in the class. Since class specifications are descriptive and not restrictive, incumbents can complete job duties of similar kind not specifically listed here.
  • Performs preventive maintenance to include lubricating, cleaning, servicing, inspecting, and testing equipment.
     
  • Uses manual and computerized diagnostic equipment to evaluate, troubleshoot, make adjustments and diagnose equipment malfunctions or defects. 
     
  • Repairs/replaces various parts and assemblies using mechanic power and hand tools.
     
  • Interprets schematics and blue prints to perform inspections, diagnosis, wiring procedures, and maintenance of mechanical, hydraulic, ignition, lighting, warning, and injection assemblies and component systems.
     
  • Operates computers, interprets parts, service, and automated equipment management system/ manuals to perform research, order parts, prepare records, and analyze equipment malfunctions.
     
  • Fabricates parts, performs gas/electric welding and makes body repairs.
     
  • Responds to road service requests and/or assists with tow trucks/wreckers.
     
  • Conducts road test/operational checks for diagnostic purposes to determine equipment deficiencies and for post-maintenance tests.
     
  • Cleans and cares for tools, equipment and shop facilities.
     
  • Follows safety rules and practices, and complies with Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) standards in the performance of duties.

Levels of Work

EQUIPMENT MECHANIC I

This describes first level mechanical trade work, encompassing activities as described in the Essential Functions. This level is involved in completing basic repairs on a variety of equipment and performing routine preventative maintenance and repair work under supervision of a technical superior.

  • Performs minor and basic equipment repairs using standard mechanic power and hand tools.
  • Performs simple inspections such as walk around inspections and reports visible equipment discrepancies.
  • Diagnoses and isolates easy to trace malfunctions.
  • Assist technical superior with more complex maintenance/repairs.
  • May instruct equipment operators on the application of preventive maintenance.

EQUIPMENT MECHANIC II

This describes mechanic trade work at the intermediate level. Positions report to a technical superior. Assignments require a degree of evaluative thinking and are carried out in accordance with standard trade practices and general work instructions. This level diagnoses and trouble- shoots equipment malfunctions, makes determination of the problem and effectively repairs a variety of equipment, which may be unique to the agency.

  • Discusses malfunctions and proper operation/care of equipment with operators, and observes, tests, and evaluates equipment to determine corrective actions.
  • Conducts comprehensive inspections, diagnoses equipment and isolates major assemblies/modular component malfunctions and makes repairs using specialized tools.
  • Performs routine wiring procedures using diagrams and schematics.
  • Performs routine engine tune-ups on light duty engines/system components, such as those used to power pickup trucks, sedans, vans, lawn mowers and chain saws.
  • Assembles, and installs specialized equipment using diagrams and schematics.

EQUIPMENT MECHANIC III

This describes mechanical trade work at the full performance level. Positions operate within standard guidelines and alternatives under the supervision of a technical superior. This level works with more independence to troubleshoot and repair integrated mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and related systems.

  • Diagnoses and isolates integrated hydraulic, electronic, and mechanical system malfunctions. Makes intricate adjustments and alignments to front ends/brakes and other drive line components using test, measurement, and diagnostic equipment.
  • Disassembles and overhauls major components of light duty engines/systems, such as those used to power pickup trucks, sedans, vans, lawn mowers and chain saws.
  • Evaluates and repairs emission control systems and performs comprehensive engine tune-ups and adjustments on light duty engines/systems and power train/components such as those used to power pickup trucks, sedans, vans, lawn mowers and chain saws.
  • Performs complex wiring procedures.

EQUIPMENT MECHANIC IV

This describes mechanical trade work at the advanced level. Positions operate independently to perform complex work on heavy duty engines with pistons which directly power multiple hydraulic and pneumatic systems and large multiple, interconnected engine systems, and heavy duty equipment such as crawler tractors, power shovels, hot mix pavers, and equipment of similar complexity. Positions continually determine practical solutions to problems by applying specific processes, techniques, and methods, and serves as a resource to others.

  • Diagnoses and repairs/calibrates equipment requiring multiple calibrations involving multiple systems with integrated functions such as forced feed belt loaders and hot mix pavers.
  • Repairs, adjusts/calibrates equipment requiring a series of precise alignments/adjustments using specialized tools/measurement instruments.
  • Repairs major engine components by honing/facing or adjusting items such as valves, tappets or seats.
  • Removes/replaces internal and external parts to include solid state integrated circuits and printed circuit boards/cards.
  • Performs heavy body and sub-frame repairs and/or gelcoat, fiberglass repairs.
  • Assesses and recommends replacement of major components based on reparability/cost effectiveness; document recommendations.
  • Attends advanced training provided by Master Mechanics, management and other sources.
  • Provides technology transfer to lower level mechanics and advises management of emerging technologies.
  • Troubleshoots unusual equipment problems using trade literature, dealerships, and manufacturer representatives as resources.
  • May function as lead worker.

MASTER MECHANIC

This is mechanical and machinist repair and reclamation work at the expert level. At this level, positions will conduct/oversee maintenance, fabricate, repair, rebuild, maintain, modify, and install major systems on a variety of light, heavy duty/watercraft/ and/or all-terrain equipment. Incumbents will be relied upon to provide advanced training to lower level mechanics, make recommendations to repair or replace equipment and provide information used to set fiscal year equipment budget.

  • Designs and fabricates parts and tools.
  • Fabricates, machines, and welds intricate components of equipment/machinery/watercraft, and related accessories requiring detailed and precise mechanical and machine work.
  • Conducts special inspections/modifications/repairs requiring extensive disassembly and repairs using complex specialized equipment such as head machine, engine boring bar, sun & bore gauge, head planing machine, honing machine, magna flux and the engine dyno engine tester.
  • Improvises, substitutes, and/or alters parts to fit and mesh in systems for which the parts were not designed or when technical manuals, diagrams, schematics, or similar guides do not apply.
  • Develops mechanic/machinist skills of fellow employees, and directs/oversees maintenance work of lower level mechanics.
  • May develop, implement and revise preventative maintenance plans for assigned equipment including scheduling of repairs based on agency priorities.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

The intent of the listed knowledge, skills and abilities is to give a general indication of the core requirements for all positions in the class series; therefore, the KSAs listed are not exhaustive or necessarily inclusive of the requirements of every position in the class.
  • Knowledge of the occupational hazards and safety precautions relevant to the trade.
  • Knowledge of the methods, materials, equipment, tools and practices of the trade.
  • Knowledge of the principles of operation of the internal combustion engine (gasoline and diesel, two and four stroke) and other mechanical components such as brake systems (air and hydraulic), the electrical system and the hydraulic system.
  • Knowledge of basic operation of diagnostic equipment.
  • Skill in basic mathematical computation.
  • Skill in the care and use of tools, machinery, materials and equipment of the trade.
  • Ability to apply mechanical concepts.
  • Ability to interpret/understand and perform verbal and/or written instructions.
  • Ability to keep records and prepare written reports.
  • Ability to diagnose and repair readily traceable equipment malfunctions.
  • Ability to interpret technical manuals.
  • Ability to instruct equipment operators on the application of preventive maintenance.
  • Ability to learn basic principles and techniques of the welding trade.
  • Ability to use personal computers and job related software.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
In addition to the above Knowledge, Skills and Abilities, the Equipment Mechanic II requires:
  • Skill in the use of specialized tools such as torque wrenches and pressure gauges to make repairs of major assemblies/modular equipment components.
  • Skill in performing routine engine tune-ups on light duty engines/system components, such as those used to power pickup trucks, sedans, vans, lawn mowers or chain saws.
  • Ability to use evaluative thinking to make determination of malfunctions on a variety of equipment which may be unique to the agency.
  • Ability to apply the principles and techniques of the welding trade.
  • Ability to perform routine wiring procedures using diagrams and schematics.
In addition to the above Knowledge, Skills and Abilities, the Equipment Mechanic III requires:
  • Skill in using diagnostic equipment to isolate integrated mechanical, electronic, and/or hydraulic systems deficiencies.
  • Skill in evaluating emission controls systems and performing comprehensive engine tune-ups on light duty engines/system components, such as those used to power pickup trucks, sedans, vans, lawn mowers or chain saws.
  • Ability to disassemble and overhaul major components of light duty engines/systems and power train/components such as those used to power pickup trucks, sedans, vans, lawn mowers or chain saws.
  • Ability to repair integrated mechanical, electrical, and hydraulic systems malfunctions.
  • Ability to perform complex wiring procedures.
In addition to the above Knowledge, Skills and Abilities, the Equipment Mechanic IV requires:
  • Skill in complete repair/rebuilding/calibrating heavy-duty engines, power trains, stabilizing mechanisms and related equipment requiring multiple integrated calibrations.
  • Skill in troubleshooting unusual equipment problems using trade literature, dealerships and manufacturer representatives as resources.
  • Ability to estimate the extent of repairs and associated cost and labor to determine replacement of equipment.
  • Ability to perform heavy body and sub-frame repairs and/or gelcoat fiberglass repairs.
  • Ability to train other mechanics in the repair of equipment.
In addition to the above Knowledge, Skills and Abilities, the Master Mechanic requires:
  • Skill in repair/rebuilding of track/watercraft systems.
  • Skill in applying machinist principals and techniques to fabricate/modify mechanical, electrical, parts/equipment.
  • Skill in making precision mechanical/electrical/hydraulic adjustments.
  • Skill in using complex specialized equipment to repair/rebuild heavy-duty engines, power trains, axles, wheel/track systems, power takeoffs, hydraulic mechanisms, steering, brakes and stabilizing mechanisms.
  • Skill in using gas or electric welder to repair/fabricate/modify equipment.
  • Ability to conduct advanced level mechanic/machinist training.
  • Ability to improvise, substitute, and alter parts to fit and mesh in systems.

Job Requirements

JOB REQUIREMENTS for Equipment Mechanic IV
Applicants must have education, training and/or experience demonstrating competence in each of the following areas:

  1. Six months experience in diagnosing, repairing, rebuilding and calibrating light and heavy-duty engines, power trains, stabilizing mechanisms and related equipment requiring multiple integrated calibrations.
  2. Six months experience in troubleshooting and repairing integrated mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and related systems on vehicles and equipment.
  3. Six months experience in gas and electric welding.
  4. Six months experience in performing body, sub-frame or fiberglass repairs.
  5. Possession of a valid Driver’s License (not suspended, revoked or cancelled, or disqualified from driving).

CLASS:
MCCA01
EST:
9/27/2000
REV:
1/1/1900
FORMERLY JOB CLASS:
62710

CLASS:
MCCA02
EST:
9/27/2000
REV:
1/1/1900
FORMERLY JOB CLASS:
62711

CLASS:
MCCA03
EST:
9/27/2000
REV:
1/1/1900
FORMERLY JOB CLASS:
62712

CLASS:
MCCA04
EST:
9/27/2000
REV:
1/1/1900
FORMERLY JOB CLASS:
62713

CLASS:
MCCA05
EST:
9/27/2000
REV:
1/1/1900
FORMERLY JOB CLASS:
62714